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 Course Index

Core Courses | Gateway Courses | Electives

Africana Studies | American Studies | Anthropology | Asian Studies | Economics | Gender + Women’s Studies | Geography & Environmental Systems | Global Studies | Health Administration and Policy Program | HistoryMedia and Communication Studies | Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communication | Political Science | Sociology | Spanish

***Please note:  Because the Global Studies curriculum draws from 11 departments and programs, it is impossible to note all the prerequisites in the Course Index.  It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of any prerequisites that may be required before taking particular upper-level courses.  For example, upper-level courses in the Department of Economics typically require one or more prerequisites.***


~Core Courses~

GLBL 101 — Introduction to Global Studies
An introduction to the forces of globalization affecting economic, political and social relations in the twenty-first century. This topic is inherently multi- and interdisciplinary and so the course will feature units on the parameters of the global economy, institutions of global governance, and the challenges of human security – all of which increasingly transcend borders. Intended as a first course in Global Studies for both majors and non-majors.

 

GLBL 301 — Approaches to Globalization
This seminar course closely examines the dynamics of globalization and the ways in which different disciplines try to understand its causes and consequences. Beginning with causes, cultural, economic, political, social, and technological drivers of globalization will be studied.  Moving on to consequences, the focus will be on issues such as the diffusion of cultural norms, the conduct of diplomacy, development and public health, environmental challenges, international trade and finance, political activism and state-society relations, large-scale population movements (refugees, migrants, diaspora communities), and the proliferation of weapons.  Throughout the course, students will consider how the various Global Studies disciplines conceptualize and analyze globalization’s dynamics.  Emphasis will be placed on careful reading, seminar discussions, and structured writing assignments.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI).


~Gateway Courses~

AFST 211 Introduction to Contemporary Africa
A survey of contemporary Africa, its geography, peoples and cultural heritage. Economic, cultural, political and social changes on the continent since World War II, including the struggle for independence and the problems of nation-building.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS).

 

ANTH 211 — Cultural Anthropology
An introduction to the central concepts and issues in cultural anthropology. The course employs a worldwide comparative perspective that examines topics such as: the concept of culture, cultural-ecological systems and family organization; magic, religion and witchcraft; socialization, personality and mental illness; conflict resolution and warfare.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)

 

ASIA 101 Introduction to Asian Studies
This course introduces students to the field of Asian Studies. Topics such as the concept of Asia, the historiography of the study of Asia (how Asia has been viewed in academic scholarship and popular culture), the debate about ‘Asian values’ and contemporary Asian culture will be explored. Guest speakers will introduce the study of Asia from the perspective of their particular disciplines, such as economics, music, history, gender and women’s studies, visual arts, and literature.

 

ECON 101 — Principles of Microeconomics
Basic economic principles and their policy applications: value and price for the firm and industry in different competitive situations, public policy toward the firm, income distribution, elements of international economics and comparative economic systems.
Attributes: Social Science (SS)

 

ECON 102 — Principles off Macroeconomics
Basic economic principles and their policy applications: economic methods and institutions, measurement of aggregate economic activity, national income determination, business cycles and economic growth, and elements of aggregate economic policies such as monetary and fiscal policy.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)

 

GES 102 — Human Geography
Study of the distribution of human activities and the causes and consequences of these distributions, including population, resources, economic activity, urban and rural settlements and cultural phenomena.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)

 

GES 120 Introduction to Environmental Science and Conservation
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of how the earth and the earth’s ecosystems work, how they are interconnected, and how humans utilize and impact natural resource systems. Environmental problems and solutions are examined and natural resource conservation strategies and policies are reviewed. Topics covered in the course include ecosystem processes, climate and climate change, biodiversity and endangered species, land degradation and deforestation, human population growth, agriculture, and water and soil resources.
Attributes: Science (non-lab)

 

GWST 340 — Global Perspectives on Gender and Women
This course focuses on how gender influences social, economic, and political forms of globalization, development, labor and migration, international sexual and health politics, and activism in various regions outside of the United States. We start with representations and consider how “women” have been constructed as a group cross-culturally and as part of feminist imaginaries. We analyze case studies of global and transnational movements for change led by women around the world. Finally, we discuss the ways in which gender matters as a framework for understanding global relationships and politics.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)

 

HIST 200 — Themes in World History
A history that covers the globe thematically from voyages of discovery, to colonization, cultural contact, empire, slavery, race, nation, migration, technology and the environment. Specific themes to be announced each semester. Recommended to students seeking an international historical perspective on world issues.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)

 

MLL 280 — Introduction to the Spanish-Speaking World
An historical overview and cultural analysis of societies in which Spanish is the dominant language, including Spain, Latin America and Hispanic communities in the United States. Intended primarily to provide greater insights into the realities experienced by speakers of Spanish.
Attributes: Culture (C)

 

MLL 305 — Introduction to Intercultural Communication
This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the basic issues of intercultural communication and acquaints them with the fundamentals of intercultural training. Drawing on linguistic theory, anthropological definitions of culture and ethnicity, and extensive case studies, the course begins with a discussion of the nature and function of verbal and nonverbal communication in multicultural settings. The second part of the course examines the ways in which conflicts may arise between cultures and explores the development of intercultural competence and the resolution of cultural conflicts via intercultural training.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or prior study in anthropology, linguistics or a related discipline.
Attributes: Culture (C)

 

POLI 260 — Comparative Politics
This introductory course provides a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts in comparative politics. During the semester, students will learn to think critically and analytically about politics. In addition, students will learn about different political systems across the globe and how they function and provide governance to citizens.
Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)

 

POLI 280 — International Relations
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of international relations. Students are taught the basic concepts, main theoretical approaches, and major issues in the study of world politics. The central purpose of the course is to help students develop the conceptual tools and analytical skills necessary for explaining international affairs. Students who choose to take POLI 280 MAY NOT subsequently enroll in POLI 281.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)

 

POLI 281 International Relations (w/ writing focus)
This course offers the same content as POLI 280; however, it is designed as a ‘writing-intensive’ version of the course. Students who choose to take POLI 281 MAY NOT subsequently take POLI 280.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI), Social Sciences (SS)


~Electives~

Africana Studies

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AFST 212 — Introduction to African History
A survey of ancient and medieval kingdoms of Africa, the spread of Islam in Africa, European slave trade, white settler penetration of southern Africa and Arab penetration of East Africa, the colonial conquest, the 20th century and the emergence of nationalist movements seeking independence.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

AFST 213  Africa: Culture and Development
This course provides a general introduction to Africa. It is designed to survey its peoples, languages, cultures, societies and development. An emphasis is placed on how language and development are interrelated. Modules are offered to students to build on their special interests in the continent.
Attributes: Arts & Humanities (AH), Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

AFST 312 — West African History
History of West Africa from the period of the medieval empires through the era of the slave trade, the revolutionary 19th century, colonial rule and independence.
Recommended Preparation: AFST 211 or AFST 212 or HIST 242 or HIST 243, or permission of instructor.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

AFST 314  Islam in Africa
This course is presented to provide the student with an introduction and overview of the history of Islam in Africa. This requires a discussion of Islam itself, its origins, philosophical thought, praxis and expansion. We then will turn to a more detailed examination of the penetration of Islam in Africa, eventually concentrating on its sub-Saharan influences.
Recommended Preparation: AFST 211 or AFST 212 or HIST 242 or HIST 243.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

AFST 320 — Contemporary African Politics
Nationalism and the struggle for independence. The evolution of post-independence systems and institutions. Examination of problems and trends since independence, including development administration, territorial and ethnic conflicts, nation-building and the role of the military, decolonization and neocolonialism, and Africa in world affairs.
Recommended Preparation: AFST 211 or HIST 242. This course is repeatable for credit.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

AFST 323 — Economic Development in Africa
The economic structure of traditional African societies. Domestic methods of production, distribution and exchange. From colonial economic exploitation to post-independence underdevelopment. The nature of economic development, planning, regional cooperation, international trade and foreign aid.
Recommended Preparation: AFST 211.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

AFST 411 — American Foreign Policy and Africa
American policy toward Africa, focusing on the period since World War II. Issues include East-West rivalry, liberation movements in southern Africa, the political economy of aid and trade (the North-South dialogue), and such cultural questions as the New Information Order and the role of the Peace Corps.
Recommended Preparation: AFST 211 or AFST 212.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

AFST 430 — Healthcare in Africa  
Patterns of healthcare in Africa. Analysis of economic, political, demographic and cultural factors that influence health care delivery. Common diseases. The practice of curative medicine in urban centers and primary health care in rural areas. Traditional medicine, modern paramedical programs, child and maternal health care, family planning, nutrition, pharmacies, health education, financing, etc., and their meaning for Africa’s development.
Recommended Preparation: AFST 211 or AFST 390.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

AFST 439 — Women in Africa and the Diaspora
This course uses the comparative approach to examine the experiences of women of African descent from the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present. It will introduce students to interdisciplinary and comparative theories and materials that will enable them to explore the economic, cultural, social and political roles of women in Africa and African descended women in the United States. Using comparative gender analysis as its theoretical focus with a global perspective, the course emphasizes the diverse, shared historical experiences of women of African descent as enslaved persons, colonial subjects and victims of all forms of oppression as well as agents of social change. Examined as well are their roles in society as mothers, daughters, wives and workers along with their participation in social and political movements since the abolition era. The course also highlights how such other social indexes as class, race, ethnic, national and religious backgrounds affect women’s lives and roles in society. Problems and issues that directly affect them and how to improve their status in the face of increased globalization will be explored.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


American Studies

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AMST 200 — Multicultural America
This course will explore the evolving question of what constitutes American identity and belonging through important readings on race, class, ethnicity, religion, immigration, gender, sexuality, freedom, and equality.
Attributes: Arts & Humanities (AH)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

AMST 352 — American Culture in Global Perspective
This course is an interdisciplinary, comparative study of selected aspects of American life. Using materials and approaches from various disciplines, the course will illuminate the meaning and history of particular American social structures, cultural values and ideological themes by placing them in global perspective. Topics vary each semester but have included the history, structure and experience of American and South African race relations; the uses and meanings of “freedom” and “democracy” during the 18th-century American Revolution and 20th-century collapse of Soviet-dominated Eastern Europe; the purpose and definitions of family life, civic life and nature in Euro-American and Native-American cultures; and the interdependence of gendered economies in the United States and Mexico.
Recommended Preparation: One lower-level social sciences or humanities course focused on American society or culture.
Attributes: Arts & Humanities (AH), Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

AMST 420 — Seminar in Global America
Advanced study of a specific problem in American Signs, focusing on interdisciplinary analysis of oral, written, visual, and material representations of American life and culture and the historical and social contexts in which they are produced and consumed. A different topic will be announced each semester the course is offered. The seminar is designed to develop research and analytical skills specific to this area, and students will have the opportunity to do original research. This course is repeatable up to 6 credits or 2 attempts.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

AMST 464 — Immigration Nation
This course is a study of immigrant narratives from recent decades primarily through film and literature. New groups arriving to the U.S. long have employed narrative forms to establish recognition in America. In this course we analyze how cultural representations help immigrant groups define an ethnic American identity. In contrast to historical or political tracts, we will investigate what these longer narrative forms offer immigrant groups in their efforts to establish an American cultural identity.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


Anthropology

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ANTH 311 — Urban Anthropology
An anthropological analysis of the phenomenon of urbanism, stressing the impact of city life on social organization and culture throughout the world. Cities will be analyzed from a holistic perspective detailing the evolution and organization of non-Western cities, the impact of urban values on Third World populations and the culture of specialized urban communities – squatter settlements, skid rows, ghettos, ethnic enclaves.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

ANTH 312 — Medical Anthropology
This course is an overview of some basic findings in the field of medical anthropology. Case studies, readings, films, videotapes and other resources are used to examine folk medical knowledge, religious healing and cross-cultural studies of health behavior from an anthropological point of view. Other topics covered include folk medical practices in major American ethnic, minority, social class and subcultural groups. The resistance of Third World populations to changing their health beliefs and practices is explored. The place of trance, possession, sorcery and altered states of consciousness in healing rituals is examined.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

ANTH 316 — Anthropology of Religion   
This course examines the nature of belief systems, myth, and ritual in various societies of the world through ethnographic case studies. Cases to be examined may be drawn from societies in South America, Asia, the Pacific, Africa and the United States. Using these different case studies, the course examines a range of perspectives used by anthropologists to understand religious practices and belief systems.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ANTH 318 — Anthropology of Science and Technology
This course explores the social construction of the scientific process and enterprise both in American society and across cultures. Social expectations of science, images of science and scientists, and how scientists do their work will be examined. The course will also will focus on the production of scientific activity in the contexts of capitalism, institutional arrangements, politics and religion. The place of science in culture will be discussed with an emphasis on the fragile contract between scientists and nonscientists about the place of science in culture. Reading materials for the course often include the writings of working scientists. This course is repeatable.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ANTH 326 — American Indian Cultures
Through the use of archeological and contemporary community studies, this course will explore the diversity of traditional North American Indian and Eskimo cultures and the adaptation of indigenous peoples to America in the 1980s.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect

 

ANTH 367 — The Anthropology of Gender
The Anthropology of Gender concerns the wide range of meanings given to gender and sexuality in different settings. In exploring how gender and sexuality are culturally constructed the course does not focus on the biology of gender and sexuality per se. Rather, the course explores distinctive peoples understandings of gender and sexuality. Lectures focus on basic principles by which to examine gender in cross-cultural perspective. Readings focus on detailed and complex examples of distinctive gender and sexuality system.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect

 

ANTH 382 — The Anthropology of Globalization
Global Flows in Local Worlds examines globalization from the perspective of local communities. Students will explore the interaction among transnational economic, technological, ideological, and material flows and local ways of life. The course will use ethnographies and case studies to examine how development and tourism ideologies, media, and migration/transmigration, among other issues, are experienced at the local level, with particular attention to issues of identity, social relationships, subsistence, and well-being. By exploring globalization with a qualitative, insider perspective, this course will provide students with insight into the deep social and cultural webs connecting and transforming societies worldwide.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


Asian Studies

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ASIA 300 — Topics in Asian Studies
Topics vary, depending on the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


Economics

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ECON 280 — The International Economy
An introduction to international economic problems and issues. Topics will include the growing importance of international economic relations, comparative advantage as a basis for gains from trade, impact of various types of trade restrictions, arguments for protection, regional trading arrangements, international investment and migration, balance of payments problems, determination of exchange rates under alternative international monetary systems and special problems of developing countries.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ECON 311— Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
The course is intended to provide students with the tools necessary to understand and evaluate issues raised in more advanced special interest courses in economics. Students will study the economic theory of consumer behavior, production and costs, the firm, price, distribution, general equilibrium and welfare.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ECON 312 — Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to theoretical and applied approaches to macroeconomics. This means students will learn about the systematic study of the theory of aggregate economics, including the level and growth of national income and employment, the degree of utilization of productive capacity and the general level of prices.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ECON 382 — Asian Economic History
The countries of Asia seem likely to be central participants in the global economy and hence influences on students economic prospects for the foreseeable future. This course will focus on the history of three major Asian economies: China, India, and Japan. Students will learn about the factors that have contributed to the contrasting courses of development of China, India, and Japan as well as some of the other Asian economies considered. The course also covers the similarities and differences between how Asian economies and those of Western countries, such as the United States, have been organized. Furthermore, students will be introduced to the general factors affecting the course of economic growth and development, with particular attention given to the influence of culture and economic, political, and social institutions.
Attributes: Culture (C), Writing Intensive (WI)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ECON 385 — Economic Development
A survey of the principles and problems of the economies of less-developed countries. Includes dimensions of poverty, patterns of development, sources of growth, role of trade and industrial development, planning, the agricultural sector and the new international economic order. Case studies from Asia, Africa and South America.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ECON 387 — Economic Development of Latin America
A study of the economic history and current important economic issues of the countries of Latin America. Topics covered in this course include the economics of colonial Latin America, dependency theory, strategies of import substitution, industrialization and the debt crisis. The experiences of several specific countries will be analyzed in detail.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ECON 437— The Economics of Natural Resources
Economic theory of the use of renewable and nonrenewable resources. Economic theory is used to determine optimal pricing and use of natural resources, both in the current period and over time. Actual markets and institutions for selected resources, such as energy resources, are studied in some detail.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

ECON 439 — Environmental Economics
Economic analysis of the causes, effects and alternative solutions of the problems of air pollution, water pollution and toxic wastes. Economic theory is applied to define environmental quality goals and to analyze alternative policies for achieving these goals.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

ECON 442 — European Economic History
A survey of European economic history from prehistoric times to the present.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ECON 467 — Health Economics
The course deals with the factors underlying the demand and supply of health and medical care services. Included are the market, voluntary nonprofit and governmental sectors of the industry. Special topics are the regional coordination of hospital facilities and programs, the consumer price index, and the measurement of benefits and costs of control programs.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

ECON 481 — International Trade Theory
A survey of the major theories of international trade. An analysis of why countries trade, what determines the commodity composition of international trade and the gains from trade. The theory of trade restrictions and the formulation of trade policy. Other topics include customs unions, international factor movements, cartels and commodity agreements, and trade policies for developing countries.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

ECON 482 — International Finance
This course is an introduction to international monetary relations. The course will develop a framework useful for understanding financial flows in the international economy. This framework will be utilized to understand a number of issues that are of current interest, such as a country’s economic trade balance and exchange rate regimes, its exchange rate regime and its effect on a country’s economic policies, the role of international financial markets and their macroeconomic implications, differences between neo-Keynesians and monetarists views of international finance, and the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policies.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


Gender + Women’s Studies

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GWST 320 — Transnational Feminist Film
This course uses a feminist film studies lens to analyze transnational documentary and feature films. Drawing on feminist, documentary, and postcolonial film theory, students will gain the necessary skills to critically analyze representations of gender, race, class, nationality, and sexuality in transnational film. We will examine the politics of gender in films produced in the West and the Global South and we will assess the flows between first world and third world cinematic traditions. 
Recommended Preparation: GWST 100 and GWST 200, or GWST 210.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GWST 340 — Women, Gender, and Globalization
This course focuses on how gender influences social, economic,and political forms of globalization, development, labor and migration, international sexual and health politics, and activism in various regions outside of the United States. We start with representations and consider how “women” have been constructed as a group cross-culturally and as part of feminist imaginaries. We analyze case studies of global and transnational movements for change led by women around the world. Finally, we discuss the ways in which gender matters as a framework for understanding global relationships and politics
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GWST 342 — Gender in Modern South Asia
This course examines how gender operates as an organizing force in social, political, and economic life in South Asian countries such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. We will start by discussing representations of South Asian women from the colonial to the post-colonial period, and then using case-studies, we will explore contemporary debates related to nationalism, family relationships, sexuality, labor and migration, development, globalization and social movements in South Asia. Students taking this course will gain an understanding of the complex histories of the region, the relationship between colonialism, nationalism, post-colonial politics, identity and contemporary gender issues.
Recommended Preparation: GWST 100 or ASIA 100.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect

 

GWST 343 — Gender, Human Rights, and Political Violence in Latin America
This class examines the politics of human rights and cultural representations of gender violence in contemporary Latin American history. Focusing on specific moments of state-sponsored violence in Latin America, the class will explore broader issues relating to Western and Third World discourses on human rights, feminism and gender relations. Students taking this course will gain an understanding of the histories of the region, the relationship between universal human rights, nationalism, political violence and contemporary gender issues.
Recommended Preparation: GWST 100 or GLBL 101.
Attributes: Arts & Humanities (AH), Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GWST 366 — Doing It: Case Studies in the History of Western Sexuality
This course will explore how sexuality works in Western history. We will work with the contention that sexuality, along with connected notions of masculinity and femininity, are largely social constructions, and have been the object of intense social scrutiny and political regulation. We will investigate sexual desire and behavior, and sexual and gender ideologies, and will explore how they relate to a variety of topics such as race, marriage, reproduction, same-sex relations, religion, and the politics of state building.
Recommended Preparation: Any 100 Social Science or Culture course.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect


Geography & Environmental Systems

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GES 328 — Environmental Policy
This class examines the environmental policy process by studying how conflicting economic, social, and political interests and values compete for influence and exert power in the formulation and implementation of environmental policy. We look at the ways in which various stakeholders, including business interests, environmental interest groups, and local, national, and international governance institutions interact in defining environmental problems and formulating solutions. The class also examines the role that environmental science helps to define, and settle, debates of environmental policy, and the trade-offs between scientific expertise and political and economic concerns in policy formulation. Policies to be studied include climate change mitigation, wilderness preservation, urban land-use policy, water and air quality standards, and agricultural policy. The class draws on case studies from North American and developing country contexts.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GES 329 — Geography of Disease and Health
The application of geographical concepts and techniques to health-related problems; origins and diffusion of diseases; physical, biological, cultural and policy factors in disease and mortality; location of social service facilities and ability of health and social systems to respond to society’s needs. This course is repeatable for credit.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI), Social Sciences (SS) (GFR) 
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GES 330 — Geography of Economic Development
Study of patterns of economic development issues around the world with an emphasis on causes and solutions. Focus on the role of agriculture, manufacturing and service provision in the development process. Case studies of specific regions.
Recommended Preparation: permission of the instructor.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GES 337 — Natural Resource Management
Natural resource management (NRM) can be defined as the set of principles and practices that guide the human use of natural resources in ways that address the importance of sustaining those resources for (1) their overall ecosystem role and (2) for the health and productivity of future generations. This course offers an overview of NRM, tracing the history of evolution from traditional to ecosystem-based NRM. Problems resulting from the misuse and mismanagement of natural resources and challenges presented by management at varying spatial scales are also examined. The class will review the latest forms of NRM (integrated, adaptive, equitable, participatory/community-based, and sustainable) and case studies from the Chesapeake watershed to international contexts will be used to explore political, socio-economic, cultural and ecological realities that influence NRM strategies. A common thread throughout will be discussion of the complex relationship between environmental policy and NRM.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

GES 363 — World Regions: Contemporary International Issues
A geographical perspective on contemporary international issues, including territorial and resource disputes, migration and immigration, environment and regional economic development, and social and political conflict. Case studies of regional issues.
Recommended Preparation: GES 102 or GES 105 or three credits in a GES course.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GES 428 — Scientific Practice and Environmental Policy
This course studies the relationship between science and environmental policy. Class examines the social process by which scientific consensus emerges and the ways in which environmental policy is affected by the practices of scientists. We will also explore how unsettled scientific disputes inform concrete policy making goals, and how the policy-making process, in turn, shapes scientific research. Intersections of science and policy that we will explore include: climate science and climate change policy; ecosystem science and conservation policy; and the role of citizen science and lay expertise in resolving policy disputes.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GES 429 — Seminar in Geography of Disease and Health
Current issues in the geographic distribution of disease and health and location/allocation of health care services. Methods of analysis, including computer applications of statistics and information storage, retrieval and mapping.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GES 435 — Global Patterns of Production and Trade
This course focuses on analysis of the factors responsible for the location of industry and how these factors have contributed to the globalization of production and world trade. Course includes case studies of industries and regions of production.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GES 436 — Global Environmental Change
This course explores international dimensions of environmental issues. We examine the global dimensions of emerging economic, cultural, and political processes and their effects on issues of conservation, pollution, and natural resource management. We will explore the ways in which environmental degradation is closely linked with issues of economic development and the implications of these linkages for addressing environmental issues. We will also examine transnational actors such as finance capital, international NGOs, global corporations, and international governance bodies such as the United Nations, and their various roles in producing, and responding to, environmental problems. Specific environmental issues that will be covered include climate change, food security, water provisioning, environmental security, population growth, waste management, and urban growth.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GES 437 — Conservation and Development in the Tropics
Tropical nations face myriad challenges in pursuit of a sustainable development pathway, particularly when balancing priorities for poverty alleviation with those of environmental conservation. We critically analyze recent conservation and development strategies, and explore how those strategies are shaped by various actors. Students have the opportunity to work in teams to examine the effectiveness or potential for the latest set of strategies, and produce a review for an organization working in the Tropics.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

GES 462 — GIS and Human-Environmental Systems
This course will focus on the use of GIS in analyzing social and environmental systems that constitute complex human-environmental systems. Students will develop their spatial analysis skills, focusing on environmental processes and social contexts. Specific dimensions of environmental and social sustainability such as land use, transportation, economic development, environmental justice, etc. will be explored in detail.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect


Global Studies

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GLBL 386 The Politics of Development
This course examines how the process of economic development is governed on the national, transnational and international levels. Theories of political modernization, imperialism and dependency, the developmental state, neoliberalism and post-developmentalism will be used as alternative approaches in the study of several policy areas, such as international trade,technology and intellectual property, social welfare and natural resources.
Recommended Preparation: (GLBL 101 and GLBL 301) OR (POLI 260 and POLI 280).
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GLBL 401 — Independent Study in Global Studies
Independent reading, research, and writing supervised by a faculty member from one of the participating departments and programs in Global Studies. Intended for students who desire to study independently an aspect of Global Studies not covered by regular course offerings. Variable credit course repeatable for a maximum of 9 credits.
Recommended Preparation: GLBL 301
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GLBL 409 — Selected Topics in Global Studies
Study of a particular topic in Global Studies. The specific topic will be announced before registration.
Recommended Preparation: GLBL 101
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

GLBL 483 — International Negotiation
This course presents the principles of international negotiation. Using the case study method and a multiparty negotiation simulation, students will learn in hands-on fashion about the theory and practice of negotiation. Key conceptual notions include game theoretic models of strategic situations and mediation approaches. Special topics include the role of the media in agenda-setting, the importance of non-state actors in the 21 st century diplomatic arena, and the challenges of public goods issues in international and transnational negotiations.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 280.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


Health Administration and Policy Program

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HAPP 380 — Global Issues in Health and Disease
This course provides an international comparative perspective on measures of population health such as life expectancy, infant mortality and leading causes of mortality and morbidity. Factors affecting global health disparities such as lifestyle, environment and health systems will be considered.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HAPP 403 — Introduction to International Field Research   
The purpose of this course is to help prepare students for the increasingly sophisticated requirements of a global society, to develop an international perspective on important issues in culture, policy and practice, and to gain experience using social science field research methods. The international experience is designed to enable students to conduct field research on issues that will be of importance to the United States and Europe by studying the interrelationships of health and social policy, science and technology, culture and life style in an international context. Students learn social science research methods and vocabulary and concepts from the disciplines of sociology, anthropology and health services research. This course includes lectures, structured exercises, field trips, site visits and discussions in the United States and Switzerland.
Recommended Preparation: Six social science credits and permission of the instructor.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


History

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HIST 303 — The Second World War
Origins, nature and impact of World War II. In addition to an examination of the diplomatic and military events, the course also is concerned with the effects of “total war” on the societies involved.
Recommended Preparation: Any social science course, junior/senior status or permission of the instructor.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 306 — The First World War
Origins, nature and impact of the First World War. Particular emphasis is placed on the military, diplomatic, social, scientific and technological developments, events of the war years, and how this first total war affected the subsequent history of the United States and Europe.
Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course, junior/senior status or permission of the instructor.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 313 — America as a Great Power? U.S.Foreign Relations in the Twentieth Century
This course traces the history of U.S. foreign policy in the twentieth century as the United States rises from regional to great power. We will use a variety of primary and secondary sources to critique foreign policy decisions as well as understand the international context in which they were made. Doing so will help us understand the connection between history and current policy directions.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 327 — Modern Latin American History
This course introduces students to the social, economic, political, and cultural history of Latin America from independence to the early 1980s. The class focuses on the emergence of the modern nation-states in Latin America and the diverse experiences of politicians, peasants, guerrillas, workers, artisans, slaves, and ordinary families that shaped society after colonial rule. The course traces Latin American history both chronologically and thematically by focusing on major events, social movements, and political processes through the lenses of gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality.
Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 340 — Atlantic Revolutions
This course will examine the revolutions that the spread across the Atlantic World from the mid-18th to the mid-19th century, a period some have called the “Age of Revolutions.” The primary focus will be exploring the “successful” revolutions of the era: the rebellion of the thirteen British American colonies, the internal revolution within France, the independence movement that wound up ending slavery in the French island of Saint-Domingue (Haiti), and the numerous wars of independence in Latin America. Given the breadth of topics, the objective is not to gain an exhaustive understanding of any one revolution, but rather to explore the connections between them all.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect

 

HIST 365 — War in the Modern World
This course will examine the history of warfare from ancient times to the contingency operations of today. Lectures will focus on the development and evolution of military doctrine and theory, on organization, strategy, operations, and tactics, on weapons, terminology and technology, logistics, and the overall effect of war on the military and civilian societies. Readings will concentrate on battles, personalities, and political, diplomatic, and social events affecting warfare.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 376 — European Women’s History, 1914 – Present
An examination of the role of women in European society from the eve of World War I until the present. Because the approach will be from a political, social, economic and cultural history perspective, readings will include a women’s history textbook, primary documents, autobiographical and biographical sketches, historical fiction and scholarly analysis of the role of gender in 20th-century Europe.
Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course, 200-level literature course, junior/senior standing.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 380 — Women and Gender in Asia
An examination of the role of women and gender in Japan, China and Korea since ancient times. Topics include the influence of gender roles in work, marriage, sexuality and birth control practices. Scholarly analysis, historical fiction and film will be used.
Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 381 — Japanese History through Film and Literature
A study of Japanese history from 1600 to the present through the media of film and literature. It also explores the relationship between history and drama, in particular how they can illuminate or conceal basic truths and values of the past. Views of life and modern times, obsessions with honor and suicide, the changing role of women in society, the encounter between Japanese and foreign cultures, and themes of war and pacifism will be investigated.
Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

HIST 382 — Pacific Crossings: Race, War, and Gender in Asian Migrations
In this course, we will study the transnational history of Asian migrations from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, placing particular focus on Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Indian, Vietnamese, and Hmong migrations. We will examine the tumultuous history that both sparked migrations and, at times, tried to prevent them in an effort to understand what was happening in homelands left behind and American destinations, along with the networks of communication and travel that connect them.
Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Science (SS)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect

 

HIST 385 — Contemporary Japan, 1945 to the Present
History of Japan from the end of the World War II to the present: the American occupation, political and constitutional changes, economic recovery and the politics of Japanese capitalism, social changes, education and student radicalism, problems of a postindustrial society and the foreign policy of Japan.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 388 — Society and Culture in China
This course is a study of Chinese society and culture focusing on the main features of society, cultural developments and currents of thought in traditional and modern times.
Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 406 — The Atlantic World
Starting in the 1400s, people around the Atlantic began to interact, using the ocean as their highway. In the process of connecting with each other, Africans, Europeans and Americans transformed themselves and each other, creating new worlds, both in the Americas and at home, for all. The relatively new field of Atlantic history was developed to study these connections and transformations in the early modern period as well as how they changed over time. This course will not concern itself exclusively with one area, nor follow necessarily a chronological path. We will study the making of an Atlantic working class, coerced labor, piracy, maronage, native rebellions and anti-colonial revolutions.
Recommended Preparation: HIST 341.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

HIST 434 — The Vietnam Wars in International Context
This course studies the Vietnam Wars of 1946 to 1975: the French Colonial War as well as the American War in international context. Students will study the conflicts from a variety of perspectives, including those of North and South Vietnam, China, the Soviet Union, France, and the United States. They will also learn about the experience of the war at all levels, from presidential policy-making down to army private or civilian casualty.
Recommended Preparation: HIST 102 or HIST 304 or HIST 347.
Attributes: Social Science (SS)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 459 — Japan since 1800
Beginning with Japan’s early modern past and its forced emergence from isolation, this course will explore Japan’s rise as a modern state, its plunge into militarism and war, and its subsequent rapid emergence as one of the world’s leading nations. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, junior/senior status.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 473 — Twentieth-Century Britain: The Age of Decline
An examination of the causes and consequences of Britain’s 20th-century descent from its preeminent position of the Workshop of the World in the 19th century to its present-day status as the Sick Woman of Europe. Particular attention will be paid to the contemporary debates around the various dimensions of decline, the succession of counter-strategies adopted or canvassed to halt or reverse this process, the impact of the two world wars, and the evolution of domestic social and economic policy.
Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111 and junior/senior status.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 480 — Contemporary China, 1949 to the Present
Chinese history from the founding of the Communist regime in 1949 to the present: ideology and organization of the new regime, the role of the Communist party and the People’s Liberation Army, social changes and thought reform, arts and culture, the cultural revolution and the Gang of Four, the Four Modernizations, the democratic movement and China’s foreign policy.
Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 484 — German History: 1914 to the Present
History of Germany from World War I, through the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the Allied occupation, and the founding and development of the two Germanies. Emphasis is on the development of economic and military strength, political and social upheaval, cultural responses to war and role of Nazism in modern German history.
Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110, or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 486 — Soviet History on Trial
Students try four important cases in Soviet history and examine the full range of 20th century Russian history: radical socialism and the Russian Revolutions of 1917, the socialist social and cultural experiments of the twenties, the Stalinist Revolution, World War II, the Khrushchev Thaw, Brezhnev-era stagnation, the Gorbachev experiment, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and aftermath.
Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, plus junior/ senior status.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 488 — Europe, 1914 to the Present
The history of Europe from the outbreak of World War I until the present. Emphasis on the origins and the social and political impact of the two world wars, the Russian Revolution, the rise of fascism in interwar Europe, and the decline and the division of Europe after 1945, as well as its more recent revival and developing unity.
Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
Attributes: Culture (C), Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

HIST 494 — Seminar in World History
The Special topics course. Intensive study and discussion of the historical literature on a particular issue, problem or period of world history. Topic will be announced in advance by the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


Media and Communication Studies

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MCS 334 — Media & Globalization
This course is designed to help students to learn about the global flows of media images and the networks, capital, and people that shape and are shaped by them. Students will study a broad range of case studies and investigate new media practices that will help them to become critically aware of the relationships between global mass media and transnational cultural, political, and economic institutions. Students will also develop learn how to analyze media practices comparatively.
Recommended Preparation: MCS 101, MCS 222, MCS 333.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

MCS 390 — Transcultural Studies in Global Television
This course will study the concepts, institutions, distribution channels, production and marketing practices, products and audience reception of globally distributed television programming. Special emphasis will be placed on localization strategies, aesthetic conventions and genre traditions, notions of cultural proximity, and debates around hybridity and transculturality. Students enrolled in MLL 480 will be expected to have advanced foreign language proficiency and will be expected to examine foreign language television productions and discuss issues in the secondary literature in that language. MLL 480 students will need department consent to take the course.
Recommended Preparation: MCS 333.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect


Modern Languages, Linguistics, & Intercultural Communication

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MLL 218 — Film and Society in Latin America
An examination of recent Latin-American films and of social questions they reflect and address. Taught in English. Knowledge of Spanish is not required.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

MLL 220 — Film and Society in China
This course introduces students to Chinese society during the last 100 hundred years through the viewing and analysis of major films from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Taught in English. No knowledge of Chinese required.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

MLL 240 — Project in Cultural Sustainability
This course has been designed to help UMBC students acquire the cultural literacy and develop the tools they will need to face the challenges of globalization. Adopting an intercultural approach, it will examine the ongoing impact of the Western value system on the world. In response, students will learn how to analyze the impact of globalization on local communities and consider alternatives. They will also develop the social entrepreneurship skills needed to position themselves as agents of social change. Because local community involvement is an important element in the development of cultural diversity, heritage, and a deeper appreciation of life values, students in the course will generate a community information web site reflecting the values of sustainability.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

MLL 255 — Intercultural Paris
This culture course aims to introduce students to the field of French studies by examining France’s capital city in both historical and contemporary contexts and the numerous, marginalized, and multicultural populations it has been home to: women, gays and lesbians, North-and Western African immigrants, Jews, and undocumented workers. The course adopts an interdisciplinary approach informed by cultural studies, history, anthropology, linguistics, urban studies, and gender and women’s studies.
Attributes: Arts & Humanities (AH), Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect

 

MLL 305 — Introduction to Intercultural Communication
This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the basic issues of intercultural communication and acquaints them with the fundamentals of intercultural training. Drawing on linguistic theory, anthropological definitions of culture and ethnicity, and extensive case studies, the course begins with a discussion of the nature and function of verbal and nonverbal communication in multicultural settings. The second part of the course examines the ways in which conflicts may arise between cultures and explores the development of intercultural competence and the resolution of cultural conflicts via intercultural training.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or prior study in anthropology, linguistics or a related discipline.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

MLL 306 — Issues Confronting Immigrant and Heritage Communities
Immigration and social adjustment to a new environment could be analyzed from different theoretical perspectives. By doing service learning, students will learn to combine the analysis of immigration and the perspective of intercultural communication. Difficulties in the process of adjustment faced by new immigrants and other members of local heritage communities in the Maryland/D.C. region will allow students to explore ways in which the development of intercultural competence can help resolve cultural conflicts in a multicultural society. Guest speakers from local immigrant/heritage communities will be invited to participate in the seminars. The course will entail spending three hours per week in immigrant/heritage communities doing service learning related to intercultural communication.
Recommended Preparation: A language course above the 201 level, or MLL 305, or permission.
Attributes: Culture (C) (GFR)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect  GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

MLL 311 — Introduction to Korean Culture
This course introduces students to Korean culture. It will help students understand the values, attitudes and norms that constitute Korean culture and lead students to get the feel of the dynamic vitality of Korean culture. The course will broaden their understanding of culture in general, and Korean culture in particular. Taught in English. Knowledge of Korean is not required.
Recommended Preparation: MLL 190, 191, 230, or 301.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

MLL 315 — Images of Society in Contemporary Korean Films
Study of major works of Korean cinema, encompassing a range of genres and styles. Emphasis on the film as an art form and a mirror of society. Taught in English. No knowledge of Korean required.
Recommended Preparation: MLL 190, 191, 230, or 301.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

MLL 327 — Modern Japanese Culture
This course examines modern Japanese culture, including family structure, daily life, regional variations, interpersonal and intercultural communication, education from nursery school to college, the traditional arts still practiced in modern Japan and the development of popular youth culture. Students will deepen their understanding through cross-cultural role playing, hands-on experience with the arts and field trips. The course is taught in English.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing.
Attributes: Culture (C) (GFR)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

MLL 332 — Topics in German Culture
This course will focus on a broad spectrum of topics (events, movements, and individual thinkers) that have shaped German intellectual thought throughout Germany’s history. Students will be introduced to concepts that have had a lasting impact and are essential for a true understanding of German culture. Topics will be announced each semester offered. Readings and discussion in English. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Attributes: Culture (C) (GFR)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


Political Science

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POLI 337 — Comparative Justice
This course will examine public law systems across a spectrum of nations and in several international tribunals. We will compare the structure, powers and role of national and international courts as well as the varied meanings of justice and rights. This analysis will be conducted using cases from the courts in our study, as well as by reading scholarly and journalistic reports on the topics discussed.
Recommended Preparation: Any 200-level POLI course or junior standing.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 360 — Comparative Political Analysis
Examination of liberal-pluralist, Marxist-radical and conservative-corporatist frameworks as alternative approaches to the study of comparative politics. These approaches represent both ways of interpreting politics, as well as ways of thinking critically about them. There will be case studies of selected countries to test the propositions of the course.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
Attributes: Writing  Intensive (WI), Social Sciences (SS) (GFR)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 371 — Comparative Asian Politics
Comparative study of the politics of Asian regimes with emphasis on the origins and impact of democratic versus authoritarian regimes and the problems of modernization in such countries as Japan, India, Indonesia and China. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 373 — Comparative Middle Eastern and North African Politics
Comparative study of the politics of the Middle Eastern and North African states, including the relationship between development, political organization and social structure.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 374 — European Politics
First, the course offers an examination of classical concepts in comparative and European politics, such as electoral systems, political parties, federalism, and the welfare state. Next, we study the European Union, its history, institutions, and effects on European politics. Finally, at the very end of the semester we turn to the former Communist countries of Eastern Europe, discuss the recent regime transition that has occurred in many countries and consider the impact of the most recent enlargement on the European Union.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 377 — Latin American Politics
Comparative study of the politics of Latin-American states. Emphasis on political problems associated with development and modernization in the Western hemisphere.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 378 — Contemporary African Politics
Nationalism and the struggle for independence. The evolution of post-independence systems and institutions. Examination of problems and trends since independence, including development administration, territorial and ethnic conflicts, nation-building and the role of the military, decolonization and neocolonialism, and Africa in world affairs.
Recommended Preparation: AFST 211 or HIST 242. This course is repeatable for credit.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 380 — International Relations Theory
An intensive overview of the central schools of thought in the study of international relations (IR). We will read, discuss and write about theories rooted in realism, liberalism, Marxism, constructivism and other IR paradigms. Emphasis is on the purposes of theory, the main perspectives in IR theory and how IR theory has developed in conjunction with the evolution of international relations itself. Students should be prepared for careful reading, critical discussion and analytical writing.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 280.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 381 — International Relations of the Asia-Pacific Region
Theoretical and historical examination of international relations in the Asia-Pacific region since 1945. Topics will include: the Cold War in Asia; regional great-power rivalries; contemporary flashpoints such as the Korean peninsula and Taiwan; transnational terrorism; the U.S.-led regional alliance system; and multilateral groupings, such as APEC and ASEAN. Throughout the course, we will pay close attention to how history has shaped theory and how theory, in turn, has shaped history.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 280.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 385 — International Security
This course is both an introduction to the scholarly discipline of security studies and a broad survey of contemporary international security issues. Topics will include core concepts in security studies; strategy during the Cold War; post-Cold War international security issues, such as nuclear dangers and arms control; major-power relations in Europe and Asia; and so-called new security issues, such as sub-state conflicts, transnational terrorism, refugee and migration flows, the problem of failed states and environmental degradation.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 280.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 386 The Politics of Development
This course examines how the process of economic development is governed on the national, transnational and international levels. Theories of political modernization, imperialism and dependency, the developmental state, neoliberalism and post-developmentalism will be used as alternative approaches in the study of several policy areas, such as international trade,technology and intellectual property, social welfare and natural resources.
Recommended Preparation: (GLBL 101 and GLBL 301) OR (POLI 260 and POLI 280).
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 387 — Political Economy: A Primer
In a world of scarcity, societies use both political and economic means to determine ‘who gets what, where, when, why, and how.’ The political-economic ‘mix’ employed, reflects each society’s basic values and beliefs about what constitutes ‘the good society.’ In this course, we will examine concepts, institutions, and instruments associated with the domains of politics (e.g., power/governance) and economics (e.g., exchange/ markets). We will consider their relative strengths and weaknesses as these relate to motivating behavior and organizing collective activity in order to address the great social challenges of our day. Topical case studies will vary from semester to semester, but case study topics are likely to include climate change, affordable health care, entitlements, governing/regulating the Internet.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 390 — American Foreign Policy
This course examines how American foreign policy is created and under what constitutional authority it is established. It explores the historical underpinnings and contemporary currents of American foreign policy. The course also examines the way Americans perceive global events and considers how these perceptions influence contemporary policy.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 280 or junior standing.
Attributes: Social Sciences (SS)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 395 — National Security Policy of the United States
A comprehensive overview of the problems of policy, organization and implementation involved in providing for the national security of the United States. Background in international politics is helpful but not required.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or one course in international politics.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 430 — The Law of War
Can law constrain the use of force and the waging of war?  Can law be used to control the response to insurgencies and other internal armed conflict?  Can law cool vengeance and violence into process and peace?  In this course we examine how law, lawyers and courts respond to war and armed conflict.  We immerse ourselves in the legal, political, philosophical and historical aspects of applying the rule of law to the carnage of war and armed conflict.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 437 — International Human Rights Law
In this course we study human rights law and the many actors and institutions struggling with its enforcement. In it we use the case method to master the legal contours of human rights and explain their limits and possibilities. To understand contemporary human rights law, one has to have a good grounding in the philosophical, political and legal concepts that form the basis of international human rights. We also focus our study on efforts to find domestic and international justice, and the relationship between human rights and international law. We introduce the legal elements of various human rights provisions and take into account the role that NGOs play in the protection and sustenance of human rights regimes. Finally, we examine several specific rights through efforts to enforce them in domestic and international courts.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 230, 233, 280, 337, 432, 433 OR 482.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 460 — Comparative Institutional Development
Institutions are the rules that guide human interaction. Whenever we come into contact with other humans, institutions are involved. But where did our social, political and economic institutions come from? How did they become so firmly entrenched in our societies? This class attempts to answer these profound and often abstract questions by reading influential books on the subject and by generating our own ideas in class discussions.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 260.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 467 — Comparative Foreign Policy
This course focuses on the intersection of two important subfields in Political Science, foreign policy and comparative politics. Initial work centers on an examination of the conceptual and methodological tools for the analysis of foreign policy formulation and implementation. Students explore commonalities and differences in the behavior of states from both a regional comparative basis as well as a topical one. The latter includes decision-making theory, two-level game analysis, and an intercultural dissonance hypothesis.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 260 and /or POLI 280.
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 470 — Politics of Human Rights
The term “human rights” has become an incredibly powerful one in international relations, used as everything from a justification for support of a given country to an excuse for war against one. But “human rights” is more than a catch-all phrase differentiating the “good” from the “bad” in this world. It is a set of commonly recognized norms and laws that have evolved over hundreds of years. It is a system of international, regional and domestic enforcement mechanisms. And it is an increasingly important part of Western states’ self-identities and foreign policies. The purpose of this course is to explore what human rights are, how they have evolved, and how they influence the international and domestic political arenas.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 260, POLI 280.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 471 — Globalization and Transitional Justice
In this course we analyze transitional justice, the process by which political elites in post-repressive states account for human rights violations orchestrated by their predecessors. When and under what conditions do newly empowered political leaders choose to confront past abuses and what are the mechanisms they have at their disposal? Why do some new leaders choose to close the past with a one-line condemnation, while others establish a year-long truth commission and still others initiate a decade of criminal prosecutions? This class focuses on the political, rather than judicial, side of transitional justice, taking into account the elite calculus of risk and advantage inherent in the variety of policies political leaders have at their disposal.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 260, POLI 280.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 474 — Democratization
In this course, we explore the theory behind, and the policy questions surrounding, democratization. We begin this class by considering the outstanding traits of democracies and their alternatives, and looking at various theories that help account for why some states democratize and others do not. Next, we consider democratization from the viewpoint of the citizen in non-democratic states. In this section, we look both at the role of the masses and that of counter-elite activists as they seek to weaken the non-democratic state and replace it with a democratic alternative. Since these actors are frequently assisted by outside states, and especially the United States, we subsequently consider the pros and cons of democracy assistance. Finally, this class looks at the various conundrums common to democratizing states, ranging from choosing appropriate institutional mechanisms to the process of dealing with past human rights abuses and abusers.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 260, POLI 280.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 480 — International Organization
One characteristic of the increasingly globalized international environment is the proliferation of intergovernmental organizations (IGOs, such as the U.N., the World Bank, IMF, WTO) and non-governmental organizations (NGOs, such as Amnesty International, Greenpeace and the International Red Cross). This course examines what it means to organize internationally, both in theory and in practice. It considers the future of IGOs and NGOs and their likely impact on the dynamics of international relations.
Recommended Preparation: POLl 280 or junior standing.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 482 — International Law
This course is designed to introduce students to the complexities of law in the international environment. The course begins by familiarizing students with the American legal system, a brief overview of the international system and how cases are reported in the U.S., as well as the nature of international law. The first half of the class deals with how international law is created by examining treaties, the role of custom, general principles of law and judicial opinions. The second half of the class deals with the United Nations, nonofficial sources of law and the application of international law in specific instances, including a brief review of human rights.
Recommended Preparation: POLl 280 and any law course.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 483 — International Negotiation
This course presents the principles of international negotiation. Using the case study method and a multiparty negotiation simulation, students will learn in hands-on fashion about the theory and practice of negotiation. Key conceptual notions include game theoretic models of strategic situations and mediation approaches. Special topics include the role of the media in agenda-setting, the importance of non-state actors in the 21 st century diplomatic arena, and the challenges of public goods issues in international and transnational negotiations.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 280.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 485 — Dynamics of the Arab-Israeli Conflict
The course starts with a focus on the development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings in the period when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire. The growth of Arab nationalism and Zionism will be compared, as will the conflicting promises made by the British to both Zionists and Arab nationalists during World War I. Next is a review of British rule over both Arabs and Zionists during the Palestine Mandate. The second half of the course is an examination of the Arab-Israeli wars since 1948, the Camp David and Oslo peace processes, the Al-Aksa Intifada and developments since then. The conflict is analyzed against the background of great powers intervention in the Middle East, and the dynamics of intra-Arab politics, political Islam and oil.
Recommended Preparation: One of the following: JDST 274, 310, POLI 280 or 373.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 486 — Middle East International Relations
An examination of the development of international relations in the Middle East since the 19th century. Special emphasis is placed on intra-Arab relations, the Arab-lsraeli conflict and the role of the great powers in the Middle East.
Recommended Preparation: POLl 373 or any course in international politics.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 487 — International Political Economy
The course focuses on the basic analytical tools and knowledge of economics needed to develop an understanding of important international economic problems with which political actors must cope. The course explores the challenges for policy-makers stemming from the globalization of finance, markets and production.
Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLl 280 or ECON 280.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

POLI 488 — Politics and International Relations of South Asia
Overview of the politics and international relations of South Asia, a region that includes India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Maldives. Topics covered include the history of the region, covering the British colonial period, the awakening of nationalism in the late 19th century, the independence movements of the early 20th century and the formation of newly independent polities at mid-century; processes of political and economic development; significant issues in South Asia’s international politics, including India-Pakistan relations, Kashmir, the foreign policies of regional actors, nuclear proliferation, Afghanistan’s long war, ethnic conflict, transnational terrorism, and U.S. foreign policy in the region.
Recommended Preparation: POLI 280 or junior standing.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


Sociology

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SOCY 235 — Sociological Perspectives on Globalization
This course is concerned with the impact of globalization on societies throughout the world. It will examine the concept and significance of globalization and its impact in advanced and developing societies on human rights, technology, women and the family, education, political and economic systems, crime and terrorism, religion, environmental issues, health, ethnic groups and minorities, and the concept of the nation-state. Particular emphasis will be placed on differences in worldviews from region to region internationally and how different regions have been affected by globalization.
Recommended Preparation: SOCY 101, ANTH 211, or GEOG 202.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

SOCY 315 — Population and Society
An introduction to the study of human populations in advanced and developing countries; changes in the size, composition and distribution of populations; the economic, political and social significance of populations and national population policies. Recommended Preparation: SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 or GEOG 102.
Attributes: Social Science (SS)
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

SOCY 333 — Human Sexuality in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Norms and mores that sanction and regulate human sexuality exist universally, but their particular forms vary widely from one society to another. This course examines theories that offer a sociological explanation for the variation of sexual attitudes and behaviors in both industrialized and non-industrialized societies.
Recommended Preparation: SOCY 101 or consent of instructor.
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect

 

SOCY 403 — Introduction to International Field Research
The purpose of this course is to help prepare students for the increasingly sophisticated requirements of a global society, to develop an international perspective on important issues in culture, policy and practice, and to gain experience using social science field research methods. The international experience is designed to enable students to conduct field research on issues that will be of importance to the United States and Europe by studying the interrelationships of health and social policy, science and technology, culture and lifestyle in an international context. Students learn social science research methods and vocabulary and concepts from the disciplines of sociology, anthropology and health services research. This course includes lectures, structured exercises, field trips, site visits and discussions in the United States and Switzerland. 
Recommended Preparation: Six social science credits and permission of the instructor.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 3 Perfect

 

SOCY 420 — Epidemiology 
This course studies health and disease in populations and compares groups within populations, including age, sex, race, and ethnic groups. The course examines the sources of data and the methods used by public health researchers. It also studies methods used in public health programs to measure and control diseases and to evaluate programs.
Recommended Preparation: Research methodology and statistics.
GLBL Tr 2 Perfect

 

SOCY 433 — Gender, Work, and Family in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Work and family relationships as affected by gender stratification. Topics include separation of work and family, division of household labor, gender-wage differences, occupational segregation, impact of government work, and family policies on women and men.
Attributes: Writing Intensive (WI)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect GLBL Tr 2 Perfect   GLBL Tr 3 Perfect


Spanish

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SPAN 308 — Latinoamérica y sus Culturas I
This course is organized around a historical focus on Latin America and its diverse cultures. Through readings and discussion, the course explores aspects of the region’s history, politics, cultural achievements and contemporary life. It also seeks to develop students’ reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension. For non-native speakers, SPAN 302 should be taken prior to or at the same time as this course. This course is repeatable for credit.
Attributes: Culture (C)
GLBL Tr 1 Perfect